Frequently Asked Questions About Concealed Depression

You have certainly noticed how people have consistently avoided and ignored you in social gatherings. You have tried engaging in meaningful conversations with them. You have also offered them your sincerest intentions to help them.

However, no matter how good and true your personality is, people can’t seem to like you enough based on what you tell yourself. 

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People not liking you may be a result of several reasons. They can dislike you based on your personality. It is not a big deal. Some people may have existing misconceptions about you.

And you do not owe them any explanation about this. Although, you may have done something enormous to offend them. Regardless, if they seem defensive, guarded, or uninterested in giving you attention, it is a clear indication of how they dislike you.

Whatever the instance is, being likable is a characteristic you can develop. Research has provided evidence that hardworking, trustworthy, and motivated are traits of a socially attractive person.

If you want to be one, you can always modify your behavior towards others. Dedicate your efforts in chasing greater things in life so that you do not have to try harder to make people like you.

Nonetheless, if you are irrationally and extremely affected about your reputation on others, there could be a lingering problem. When you are less optimistic about your perceived image and other aspects of your life, you could be experiencing concealed depression. 

Concealed or hidden depression, as the name suggests it, is more difficult to notice. You may intentionally try to hide observable signs, or you may also not recognize your symptoms. Some of the common symptoms of depression are observable to concealed depression, including:

  • Disorganized sleeping patterns,
  • Fatigue,
  • Lack of interest in hobbies,
  • Irritability,
  • Appetite changes, and 
  • Low sex drive.

However, the less obvious symptoms include forced happiness, a negative outlook in life, loss of concentration, and substance abuse.

If you are interested in concealed depression and how it can affect your health in a prolonged period, we’ve listed some frequently asked questions about it below.

Is being sad all the time bad for your health?

Yes. The suppression of your negative thoughts, feelings, and emotions for an extended period can physically translate to illnesses. It can be a form of stress caused by grief, anger, or frustrations which can be extremely bad for your mental and physical health.

Can depression give you brain damage?

Yes. Prolonged effects of depression can damage your brain permanently. Specifically, it can reduce the size of your hippocampus by approximately 10 percent. An individual who suffers from depression can have problems in remembering, recalling, and concentrating.

Is depression considered a serious mental illness?

Yes. Depression is a serious mental illness affecting your ability to function socially. Individuals who experience depressive symptoms require extensive medical treatment and great emotional support.

When left unattended, these may result in severe consequences for both the patient and their families.

What diseases are linked to depression?

There are various physical diseases linked to depression. These include heart disease, kidney disease, arthritis, lupus, multiple sclerosis, and diabetes. There are also existing pieces of evidence linking HIV and AIDs to some symptoms of depression.

Who is at higher risk of depression?

Individuals between the ages of 45 and 65 have a higher risk of acquiring major depressive disorder. Young and older people, on the other hand, have higher tendencies of having severe depression. However, depression does not discriminate.

Other factors such as race, economic background, and family history may influence the likelihood of experiencing depressive symptoms.

Does depression lower your immune system?

Yes. Chronic or long-term depression can significantly lower your immune system. Inability to perform social functioning, which influences your physical and mental health, can increase your susceptibility to illnesses.

Nonetheless, pre-existing medical conditions may also trigger symptoms of depression.

What are the effects of long-term depression?

Chronic or long-term depression can ultimately decrease your quality of life. It can negatively impact your social functioning. More specifically, there can be complications in your work or school productivity.

Additionally, it can cause devastating effects on your friend and family relationships. Long-term depression can also increase your risk of acquiring other medical illnesses and mental health disorders.

Does depression change your face?

Chronic or long-term depression does not physically change your face but affects your skin disastrously. Experiencing depression disrupts your sleeping pattern, which causes hormonal imbalance.

Changes in hormones will leave you with difficulties in repairing and regenerating your skin cells. As a result, you will generate baggy eyes with a seemingly lifeless complexion.

What happens in the brain during the depression?

When you are depressed, there is an enlargement of your amygdala—the part of your brain responsible for regulating emotional responses. The increase in its size will ultimately affect your activity levels.

Specifically, it will cause disorganized sleeping patterns and hormonal imbalance, leaving you extremely tired and exhausted.

What is the number one cause of depression?

Depression can be triggered by not just one factor. Experts believe that it happens due to various causes, including genetic susceptibility, extremely upsetting life events, hormonal imbalances, and other medical issues.

They may simultaneously or individually influence the manifestation of depression.

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What causes depression in the brain?

Depression can result from a chemical imbalance in the brain. Specifically, this involves nerve cell growth and connections. Nerve circuit dynamics influence and impact depression.

Experts believe that when areas of the brain responsible for mood regulation are compromised, there can be emotional and mental dysfunction.  

Which age group has the highest rate of depression?

According to the Center for Disease Control, in 2020, the age group with the highest rate of depression in the U.S. is 18 to 29 years old.

With around 21 percent of the sample population, young adults have depressive symptoms experienced at least two weeks in 2019. This age group is followed by 45 to 64 years olds, and lastly, those who are 30 to 44 years of age.

Conclusion

Not liking yourself is difficult. Consequently, not being liked by others is even harder. When you’ve been subjected to multiple failures and disappointments, you have a greater tendency to isolate yourself.

These may be accompanied by thoughts about other people disliking or even hating you. 

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Worrying about how others may perceive you is normal human behavior. As social creatures, we are wired to please the members of our group naturally—be it our family, friends, or other social circles.

However, when it becomes irrational and excessive, it can trigger a neurotic emotional response. In this case, you will succumb to self-hatred by consistently convincing yourself that people do not like your personality.

Doing this might put your brain under a lot of mental strain, resulting in psychological distress. And this is a serious matter.

Not only can it contribute to the deterioration of your mental health, but it can also result in physical diseases. Burying these emotions and thoughts may negatively impact your overall health.

Concealed depression happens almost silently. People enduring this kind of mental health disorder may have to experience dire consequences permanently.

As mentioned earlier, chronic and long-term depression may significantly affect brain functions. Aside from this, hidden depressive symptoms may worsen social dysfunction over time if left untreated.

In cases where a significant other or a loved one is silently enduring depression and other mood orders, it is essential to talk with them without judgment. They may be uncomfortable talking about their symptoms, so it is crucial to assure and secure them.

Offering and encouraging them to seek treatment right away might be counterproductive. If they are ready to ask for professional help, you can only accompany them to their appointments.

Whether people like you or not, you are entitled to your best mental state. Your well-being and health come first.

If you are experiencing concealed or hidden depression symptoms, however severe or mild they may be, you are always advised to seek help. You should not sacrifice your mental health at the expense of pleasing everyone around you.